Change

A firm, fast raising of the sea, the beach
Now changing, heavy waves come rolling by,
Above it black and torment in the sky:
I’m scared, as nothing looks the same to me.

A greater power comes to mingle with my life,
A whirling dance of yellow-orange leaves
Invites me to go far from my believes.
From now on there shall be no gravity.

A grain of sand contains all of the world
And billions of them wash away unseen.
I’m lifted going where I’ve never been,
In noise and turmoil all is lost on Earth.

We are at ease for just so many days.
Reality is catching up once more,
Revealing life won’t be so like before
When beaches waited for our children’s birth.

Comments on: "Change" (20)

  1. Such a poignant and emotional poem. Your words I know are very personal to you but this work touches so many chords of mine. Marvellous!

  2. I would like to add that so many of your texts reference beautifully this wonderful island climate and physicality of sea and sand and forest. If you would care to meet sometime I am presently living in Lies. Many kind wishes, Alan

  3. A beautiful poem Ina that many people can take comfort from I feel. But I know its personal meaning and feel privileged that you are sharing your journey with us. Much love and lots of big hugs ❤️ Xxx

  4. A wonderfully moving work.

  5. these words, born as they are of such sad circumstance, move me deeply

  6. Very lovely, the all of it. I am just blown away by that line, “From now on there will be no gravity.” One note, you might consider a slight change on that first line. I would think it should read either “A firm raising of the sea…”or if you prefer the adverb, something like “A firmly raised sea, the beach now…” But I say it again, a excellent poem.

  7. How bravely, movingly and, of course, poetically you express the difficult and very personal journey you’re on, {{{Ina}}}. This poem is particularly powerful and affecting. Heartfelt hugs. XO❤

    • Hi {{{ Diane }}} thank you very much. I am so grateful for such nice response to this particular poem. Now Toussaint’s chemo is about to start, we have no clue what the future will be like, or what we can hope for. It indeed is a difficult journey. ❤ xxx

  8. When I was diagnosed with cancer, Ina, Ethel and I had lost our son to cancer just a short time before. I think your first lines,
    “A firm, fast raising of the sea, the beach
    Now changing, heavy waves come rolling by…”
    capture the strange experience when everything is the same, but is also changing, becoming different than it was before.
    “Above it black and torment in the sky:”
    and of course, the fact, so immutable,
    “I’m scared, as nothing looks the same to me.”
    Then the hope inside this strangeness:
    “A greater power comes to mingle with my life,
    A whirling dance of yellow-orange leaves
    Invites me to go far from my believes.
    From now on there shall be no gravity.”
    What a lovely stanza!
    And then a harsh truth is counterpoint:
    “A grain of sand contains all of the world
    And billions of them wash away unseen.”
    And then the truth mingled with the intenseness of past hope, past reality.
    “We are at ease for just so many days.
    Reality is catching up once more,
    Revealing life won’t be so like before
    When beaches waited for our children’s birth.”
    There are times when courage is difficult to find, when we want to discover that days are immutable, one following another with moments that are moments we expect and can hold on to and maybe cherish. But, of course, “reality is catching up once more,” and where are we then? Inside the whirling dance of yellow-orange leaves where gravity has been, at least for a moment, forgotten? I suppose we are a grain of sand, and a universe, as you say, Ina. There are a billion billion grains of sand in a galaxy, but this is a powerful, powerful true poem. I hope it helps you get through the days ahead, and I pray the days ahead are good ones that lead to beaches that are not changed, but are like the ones that waited your children’s births.

    • Hi Thomas,
      thank you very much for your wonderful and thoughtfull comment, your prayers as well as your encouragement.
      Yours and Ethel’s terrbile loss, the deep sadness, all is felt in your words, but also your courage. I shall try to hold on too. At the moment it looks bad but maybe, when Winter is over, and the chemo can do something to slow the process, all will look different.

      I wish you both all the best.

  9. A deep and intense poem – and oh so beautiful Ina!

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