He and his friends
hunted on rabbits;
the dead corpses hanging in the shed
not undone from their fur
were the yield of that night,
the success, the triumph.

But in the morning,
sunrise in the shed,
I could hear him go there
and in the haze of the day
I saw his hand, so fragile now,
stroking an animal
he never wanted to kill.

Advertisements

Comments on: "The man becomes my father" (15)

  1. Colin Morley said:

    Lovely imagery. So often necessity in life forces us to act against our deeper feelings (and still I am not a vegetarian!)

  2. Life in a nutshell.

  3. Very isual I a.

    I am glad I am vegetarian; I couldn’t kill anything

    L&H xx

    • Hi Christine,

      no killing animals is not something I would like to do either, but if needed. maybe I could. Not sure how far hunger could drive me 🙂 Far, probably…

      L&H xx

  4. You kill bacteria. Cockroaches, termites. And you don’t even eat them. Just where is that bright, shiny line? Usually in someone else’s yard!

    • I don’t kill insects, but I am sure I have killed zillion bacteria. I think the line is simply not there. I eat fish, sometimes meat. Eggs that might have become chicks. But that doesn’t mean I could kill a rabbit, or another animal myself. And my father apparently had a problem with it too. That is what I liked about him 🙂

  5. Let’s not turn the comment thread into a debate about vegetarianism.

    This is a well-thought poem, and well-wrought too. I am wondering if there is a subtler way of expressing the final thought/line, but that still retains its clarity…

  6. Death – Life – Parents – Memories – the sacrifice of living beings for us…

  7. I don’t think you need to make the last line more ‘subtle’ – it needs to be said as you did. I love this, the conflict within your father is one so many of us struggle with. I don’t like to kill anything, but do eat fish and chicken, and sometimes a poor bug – like the little fly on the wash basin the other day. I tried to move him but instead squashed and drowned him. Beautiful poem, Ina. XO ♥

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: